Living a Balanced Life

One of my goals is to live a balanced life. What comes to mind when you think of balance?  Is it Lady Justice with a scale balancing the evidence to determine a just verdict in a trial? Do you visualize a young gymnast walking a balance beam or a bicyclist performing a difficult feat?

A balanced life involves paying attention to your purpose and keeping everything in its proper place to accomplish your goal.  Failure to keep your balance can be hurtful to you and others.

How do we find a healthy balance in our culture? We live with daily tension between our culture’s lure to self-centeredness and our calling to be “salt and light” in a world that is desperately looking for love in all the wrong places. Paul encourages us to balance our life by applying the teachings of Christ in our culture rather than being shaped by its values.

In his letter to the Philippians, he tells us to live out our salvation experience in our current environment of unbelief and opposition: “Work out your salvation with fear and trembling…in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you appear as lights in the world” (Phil. 2:12, 15).

I believe a large part of our struggle with balance is our confusion between the goal of life and the counterfeit offers of our culture. Maybe we are so busy with the “means” that we haven’t thought deeply about the “end” or purpose of our existence. A few seem to get it, but many do not. God has intended that our money, time, health, and all good things he has made available to us are to serve as a means to an end. When we forget where these gifts originate or the purpose for which they exist, we become very narrowly focused and selfish. If we follow the way of our culture, our possessions will inevitably possess us.

You can find help to balance your family life in my books Parenting With a Purpose and Marriage is What You Make It at www.cosdavis.com. (book tab)

Life Lesson: Trust

Webster defines trust as “assured reliance on the character, strength, or truth of someone or something.” Let that sink in a minute. Where do your thoughts take you? Do you have an unreliable vehicle or appliance? Are there certain politicians who come to mind? More importantly, are there family relationships such as husband, wife, siblings, children,  parents, or “friends” whom you doubt you can really depend on when you need help?

One of our greatest needs as human beings is to feel safe with others, to believe another person can be trusted to always want and seek what is best for us. This kind of faith or trust is the glue that makes marriages and friendships work. Trust in a parent is what helps a child feel emotionally safe and provides a character example for them to emulate.

Trust is an important quality that seems to be in short supply nowadays. For many years I’ve been hearing that people have been losing trust in government and institutions such as the church.  Why have people become skeptical of many political leaders, church leaders, educational leaders, government agencies? For the same reason husbands and wives lose trust in each other. For the same reason, parents and children doubt each other. For the same reason, friendships fall apart. Our form of government, the purpose of the church, and the ideal of marriage and family are not the problem. Character is the issue. More specifically, the lack of trustworthiness is the heart of the issue. 

Trust is like a delicate flower that grows only in a certain kind of environment. Take that environment away and the flower gradually shrivels up and dies. The same is true about the trust that is so vital to all our important relationships.

Here are some of the things I think help the delicate flower of trust to thrive:

  1. Be honest in what you say and do. Do not deliberately or carelessly mislead someone.
  2. Be consistent in what you say you believe and how you act.
  3. Own your mistakes and apologize for any wrong you do and attempt to repair the relationship.
  4. Do not blame others or your circumstances for your bad choices and actions.
  5. Respect the thoughts and feelings of others. Everyone is created in the image of God and should not be treated as a “thing” to get what you want. Follow the “golden rule.”

Perhaps there are other trust nutrients you would add to what helps your delicate flower of trust thrive. What is important to you in growing a trusting relationship? Share that with me. Thanks. Cos

Life Lessons: Gratitude

As most of you know, I’m in my eighth decade here on this planet. In other words, I’m old. And in my days, I’ve experienced good and bad, health and sickness, success and failure, and satisfaction and disappointment.

From time to time I have received a smile and nod of the head of another elderly person when I make this remark: “By the time you learn how to live, it’s almost time to die.” If you pay close attention to what matters in life you can learn some important lessons.

I think I have learned a few things along the way that I could tell some younger folks if they would listen. Some of us older folks would do well also to pay attention to the lesson I’m about to mention; it would make us more considerate and easier to be around. Here’s my life lesson for today:

 Every day goes better when I begin it with gratitude. “Thank you, Lord, for giving me a new day” is my prayer most mornings or sometimes during the day. Each day is a gift; it’s not earned or guaranteed. My life is in God’s hands, and that attitude helps me keep perspective on how very blessed I am.  Reading Psalm 103 helps me remember this truth. How does that psalm begin? “Bless the Lord, O my soul; and all that is within me, bless his holy name. Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget none of his benefits.”

Did you notice what the psalmist is doing? He is telling himself to give thanks to the Lord. After telling himself to be grateful, he goes on to list many ways in which the Lord has blessed him and those who follow him. I often need to follow this pattern at the beginning of the day and other times when I feel discouraged or confused, remind myself to give thanks and make a list of ways in which the Lord has been faithful throughout my life.

My faith is refreshed when I remember the many challenges I’ve faced in my younger days and how the Lord has always provided everything I have needed. Whatever challenges you may be facing today or in the near future, commit it to the Lord and give thanks for specific ways he has provided for you to this day. He is faithful and will do it again.

Pay Attention to the Packaging

 

I’m not a movie critic but will recommend you watch “Second Hand Lions” sometimes when you need a good laugh and a reminder of where our real riches are found. It is one of my favorites, the story of two elderly brothers who retired to an old house on a run-down farm in a rural area in the southwest. Unexpectedly, their great nephew was dropped off for them to care for while his mother continued her loose lifestyle.

The brothers had become “filthy rich” in their adventures in the Middle East and had stashed their treasure in their dilapidated barn. Although they were elderly, they had not lost their zeal for adventure and were willing to go to their stash to support whatever might interest them. They flew a bi-plane, bought a yacht for their small lake, a skeet machine for their entertainment, and a second-hand lion they proposed to hunt for sport.

The part of the story I want you to think about is how the older brother decided to plant a vegetable garden to occupy their time and provide healthy food for their meals. He had never gardened before. He was sold several packets of seeds, supposing them to be a variety of vegetables such as carrots, cucumbers, squash, corn, etc., and put the package at the head of each row to identify the vegetable they would gather from the seeds planted there. Weeks later the garden was showing promise but needed some weeding. The younger brother decided to help but was confused by what he was seeing. Looking over the expanse of the growing plants he asks, “What is this?” and repeats the question about various other rows.

The brother whose idea it was to plant the garden answers, “Well, this is squash, that is carrots, and this one is corn,” to which the inquiring brother replies, “It all looks the same to me; it’s all corn,” and throws down his hoe and storms out of the cornfield. Although the packaging was labeled as carrots, squash, and assorted other vegetables, all of it was corn. The truth was in the seed, not what the package advertised it to be.   

There is a consistent biblical theme that we must not ignore: we will reap what we have planted or sown. We may be fooled by the packaging, but the seed determines what will be produced. Corn seed grows corn, no matter what the package says it is.  The world and its marketplace advertise products and ideas that appeal to our pride, comfort, self-indulgence, and ego. Doesn’t God caution us to be wise and understanding about what the world is trying to sell us? The packaging can be very alluring and deceptive but the end result is bad news. “Don’t be deceived, God is not mocked. We will harvest what we have planted.”

 Christ wants us to develop a godly character that rewards us with a deep peace and purpose in this life and great rewards in the life to come. The biblical message is unmistakable; there are two paths in life. One leads to personal destruction, the other to eternal life. Sin, rejection of God’s will, brings death. Obedience to God’s will brings life. That eternal life becomes yours the moment you choose to respond by faith in  Christ’s as your Lord and Savior. 

Knowing Christ now is greater than anything this world can offer. Think of all the benefits you have now because you have put your faith in Christ to save you to accomplish His will in you. I’ve often thought that if there is no heaven or hell, knowing Christ now is the best way to live. But there is a heaven and a hell. And, we are laying up treasures in heaven right now as we choose to live faithfully. Take heart, the best is yet to come!

Your Choices, Your Character, and Your Destiny

 

What do 168 and 8736 have in common? 168 is the number of hours we have in one week. From that, you have probably concluded the 8736 has something to do with hours also. It is the hours we are given in one year.

On average an American male lives 76 years while females outlive us by 5 years, on average. Like me, some of you are “living on borrowed time.” One thing I am aware of is that I am running out of time and I need to faithfully use what I have left to prepare myself for the life ahead that has no time limit. What about you?

One of the truths I’ve been thinking about a lot recently is this: The choices I make determine my character, which in turn determines my future. This brings me back to 168 and 8736, and more importantly to 24, the hours I’m given today. This may be the only time I have left. I must make good choices about how I will invest my life because those choices will determine my character.

Somewhere I came across the idea that you can get a pretty accurate idea about a person’s character by examining their calendar and their checkbook; how they spend their time and money. The way we use time and money indicates what is most important to us. Your behaviors related to these two resources give a vital clue about your most deeply-held values. Your character, your religion, is not what you profess to believe but how you live. The decisions you make concerning your resources are the real test of who you are, not who you think or say you are. Day after day, you make choices which, little by little, make you more like Jesus or put you further and further away from being the person you were created to be.

Your incredible power of choice is exercised in many ways every day by how you treat God, yourself, family members, and others. Your character is always in the process of developing or devolving, and it is critical that you understand and cooperate with God’s plan and make wise choices in the way you invest your life.

Jesus tells us to keep things in our brief life in perspective. Our time is limited and we need to be sure we have invested our time, money, and other resources in those things that have eternal value. “Do not lay up for yourself treasures on earth where moth and rust can ruin them and thieves can steal them. But lay up for yourself treasures in heaven.” (Matthew 6:19-20).

God has given you today. How will you invest it?

“He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep for what he cannot lose.”  Jim Elliot 

Your Life is a Time-Sensitive Trust from God

Does truth really matter to you? If it does, there are several things you will need in order to have the truth and use it well. First, you will need to have a trustworthy source. Where will you get the information by which you will make decisions? This is an area of deep concern to me because I recognize two things about human nature. First, even well-intentioned people don’t have all the facts about most things. We make interpretations about things we see and hear according to the way we see life. We rarely know all the facts and circumstances as to why someone does something we don’t agree with. Do you think that may be why Jesus us tells us not to “judge” others?

The second thing I have learned through difficult experiences is that some people make a habit of lying. I used to think that something I read was true because it was in print or because someone in a place of leadership said it. How naïve and gullible I was. No longer am I so silly and ignorant. We have people and movements in our country who have an agenda that will basically destroy our country. Jesus dealt with people like this all the time. He knew who they worked for and what they represented. We cannot hide from the fact that our country is under attack. Ignoring problems doesn’t make them go away.

So, what are we to do?  Find reliable sources of information. How do you know they are reliable? Does what they say or write agree with commonsense? Is there a consistency in what they say and what they do?  Is their basic message supported by scriptural teachings and principles? The Bible, as interpreted through the life and teachings of Jesus, is our ultimate source of authority.

The bottom line for me is, does what I am reading or being told pass the tests of scriptural truth and common sense?  Now, let’s see if the truth I share with you today will meet these tests. 

The second life-changing truth I want you to consider is: Your Life is a Time-sensitive Trust from God.

This truth is a foundational teaching of Christianity. Biblical concepts such as stewardship, responsibility, judgment, rewards, discipleship, and Christ’s lordship rest on the premise that we have been entrusted with something. A trust is a property or interest held by one person for the profit or benefit of another. The owner of the property or interest in this case is God, your Creator. You are the trustee or steward of this trust.  

What is it that God has entrusted to you? He has entrusted you with your life and all that comes with it. You belong to Him. Your body, wealth, gifts, talents, and time belong to Him. According to scriptural teachings such as The Parable of the Talents, you are accountable for how you manage His interests. 1 Peter 118-19 is one of numerous New Testament reminders of the tremendous price Jesus paid to save us and make us His own, “You were not redeemed with perishable things like silver and gold…but with precious blood…the blood of Christ.”

What is the time limit on the trust God has given you? The trust remains in effect until you die. During your lifetime you are allowed to make choices that determine your character and your ultimate destiny in heaven or hell. You are not guaranteed a specific amount of time in which to execute your trust. Scripture and common sense caution you not to presume you have another day past the one you are now living. You do not know when the time for your trust will run out.

Do you believe this truth about your life being a time-sensitive trust from God? What are you willing to do, to change in order to take it seriously? How will you treat God, yourself, and others in light of this truth? God gives us only one day at a time and that is all we have. Yesterday is gone, tomorrow may not come for us but we have now. Let’s give God and others our best today and every day that He gives us.  

 

God Loves You and Has a Plan for Your Life

God loves you and has a plan for your life.

What’s your response to this statement? If you’ve grown up going to church or have been raised in a Christian home, this is something you have heard for a long time. Maybe it’s one of those ideas you’ve heard so many times you don’t think about it much anymore. But, you and I need to think about it! We need to think deeply about it because understanding that God, the Creator of this universe, loves us is critical to living a purposeful and fulfilling life.

Why do I say believing this truth is so important? Jesus tells us in John 3:16 that God loves us. We should take Jesus at His word but why is it important to believe this? When you know someone loves you, you trust them to always try to do what is best for you. That kind of love between a man and woman is a wonderful thing. That kind of love helps our children feel secure and trust us even when they don’t like our decisions. Now, think about what being loved by God implies. Knowing I am loved by God means I can trust the events of my daily life and my future to His wisdom. This kind of security bolsters my faith in Him when times are tough. In those times, I know He is working in “everything for good” for me. (Romans 8:28). Being confident that God loves me gives me hope in difficult times and encourages me to live obediently under His care.

Our loving Father also has a plan for our lives. I’m not thinking specifically about the work or profession we will have on earth. God certainly can and will lead us in our vocational choices but God has a greater plan than that for us! This plan is for you, me, and everyone who confesses faith in Jesus as our Savior. If you think Jesus died on the cross and rose again to just save you from hell, you need to listen up. Yes, if you truly trust in Jesus you will go to heaven but God has a plan for you between the time He saved you and the time you die. Specifically, His plan is to make a new person out of you. He’s not going to leave you alone. He wants to change the way you think, the way you treat Him, yourself, and others. He wants to continue the change He began in you when you first trusted Him. And, where is this plan leading? He wants to make you like Jesus. You can read it for yourself in Romans 8:29.  

This truth is central to the Christian worldview. God has created you in His image and has a plan to save you from your sin, pride, and selfishness. This plan, often referred to by terms such as salvation and sanctification, is initiated and brought about as His Spirit awakens you to God’s love and forgiveness provided through the cross and resurrection of Jesus. Once you have responded in faith to God’s offer of eternal life through the work of Jesus, He goes about the process of accomplishing His ultimate purpose for you, to form in you the very character of Jesus.

That’s right, God’s master plan is to use your life experiences, the good and the difficult, to form the character of Jesus in you. His plan is for you to live a surrendered, obedient life in which you live in the power of His Spirit and consciously, proactively dedicate and use your time, money, energies, and talents to serve Him and others.

The God of heaven loves you and has a great plan for your life! That may sound incredible but it’s true. Embrace it. Give yourself to Him and watch Him work in your life.

 

 

 

What is Truth?

 

“You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free.” John 8:32

“What is truth?” This was the skeptical question Pontius Pilate raised when Jesus claimed his earthly mission was all about truth. “For this I have been born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness of the truth.” John 14:37. Truth didn’t matter to Pilate. Although he believed Jesus to be innocent of the charges against him, he chose the politically expedient path. Later that morning, Jesus was crucified.

The truth was a threat to those who wanted to silence Jesus. They were drunk on power and Jesus’ life and teaching were exposing the shabby lies of their pretentious religion. These religious leaders would fabricate any lie, go to any length to get him out of the way. The crucifixion appeared to settle the issue. They had won. Or, so they thought. There was just one big problem. You can’t kill the truth.

Jesus has said, “I am the way, the truth and the life.” John 14:6. Our Christian faith rests on the truth, the reality that God raised Jesus from the dead. There is such a thing as absolute truth. So what is truth? Truth is something that reflects reality. Reality is the way things really are. When someone tells you the truth they are giving you facts or information that match the way things really are. People who are honest can make mistakes with the facts but their intention is to always give you their best effort to tell it like it is. Truth tellers have no “spin,” and no agenda other than to tell the truth. 

Common sense and truth seem to be in short supply in our country today. Both political parties have their agendas and biases. Sometimes it seems we are left to choose a candidate on the basis of who gets the least “Pinocchios.” This is tragic for many reasons. Lies are no way to run a country or build your personal life. Lies lead to terrible decisions because they aren’t based on reality. Rather than tell the truth, liars generally tell other lies rather than face the mistake they have made. According to Jesus, Satan is the father of lies, and those who practice lies are children of the devil. John 8:44

I believe it was Thomas Jefferson who said something to the effect that our ability to remain a free people depends on our news organizations giving us accurate information.. Any wonder why our country is in such a mess? Now, I’m not so naive as to think that everybody wants the truth because truth doesn’t serve their purposes to have control and power over the rest of us. What does all this have to do with Critical Race Theory, the southern border, covid, masks, Afghanistan, and a number of other issues? I don’t know for sure but  I think a lot of what we are told doesn’t match reality. And like in any other relationship, I tend to become skeptical and lose trust when people don’t take responsibility for their actions and do not do their best to give me the truth.  It’s kinda like my relationship with my Cockoo clock. For a while, I could trust that when the bird cuckooed five times it was five o’clock. But, the clock got messed up and I know that the bird is lying to me because I can see it’s really one o’clock when it is telling me it is five. The bird needs an adjustment to reality. And so does our country and perhaps some of us do also. 

I don’t have all the answers to our nation’s woes but I do believe the ultimate solution comes down to our individual choice to seek and follow the truth. For that reason, I hope to share some truths in the next three blogs that have the potential to change your life.  Before investigating these life-changing truths, I want to remind you of an essential fact about truth, any truth. Truth has the power to change your life, but you must do something for that to happen.

In the early 1880s Thomas Edison developed a way to provide electricity to areas of New York City. For centuries experiments had been conducted with lighting but few saw the practical potential for harnessing the power of electricity for everyday use. There were some early doubters about its effectiveness but today electricity has become so widespread that no one wants to do without the cool air it can produce on a humid day or the many other conveniences it makes possible. Electricity is a reality, a kind of “truth,” if you will.  Electricity “can” dispel the darkness from a room, but it “will” light up the room only if you do what is necessary to release its power. Likewise, these truths can change your life. What will you need to do for that to happen? Believe them to the extent that you put them into practice. When Jesus said, “You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free” he was talking about knowing truth at a deep experiential level. This kind of “knowing” requires action, putting the idea into use. Truth is useless unless we act on it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Life in Review

 

 The convergence of several crises such as we have dealt with in recent years can create a sense of upheaval and bewilderment. At the beginning of this century’s third decade, America’s economy was booming. Unemployment rates were low, the lowest ever in several minority sectors. The usual political rancor and vindictive rhetoric of Washington D.C. continued to dominate the media in anticipation of November’s national elections. But, despite the deep political and value-based divisions, our country seemed to be doing pretty well. Most of us had no clue what was about to hit us.

A SARS virus, commonly called Covid-19, discovered in late 2019 in China, made its way to the United States and almost 180 other countries by early 2020. Confusion reigned concerning the virus’s strength, how it spread, and the steps needed to mitigate its potential effect. Responses made at the national, and some state and local levels were considered by many as an overreaction that inflicted death to many elderly, unnecessary damage to the economy, and interrupted our children’s education. Children were forced to remote learning for months without seeing their classmates or inside a classroom. Life as we knew it was drastically altered by “lockdowns,” imposed by governors, mayors, school administrators, and teachers unions.

Predictions about the effect of the loss of in-class learning on this future generation are pretty grim. And what will be the lasting impact on our nation’s economy and our national psyche going forward?  Will these events leave emotional scars and fears similar to the generation who lived through the Great Depression of the 1930s?

While Covid-19 dominated daily news, other devastating events were also hammering us. Thousands of acres of California and the Northwest went up in flames. An unprecedented ten hurricanes hit our country’s mainland; lives were lost, properties destroyed by floods and raging winds.

While we were dealing with the personal challenges related to the virus and the forces of nature, the long-term, internal battle for our nation’s identity continued. For many years, there has been a constant tearing and stretching of the fabric of our country’s soul by political rancor in D.C., racial tensions, and the “counter-culture” movement. 

You may have been among the multitudes who hoped the arrival of January 1, 2021 would somehow usher in a sense of optimism and healing, a cessation of our troubles, and a return to “normalcy.” What happened? Almost miraculously, vaccines to combat the virus were available by January 2021, but the process of getting people inoculated was cumbersome and disorganized in many states and communities. It would be several months before the medicines would be available to all who needed them.

The estimated count for American lives lost due to covid-19 was in excess of 500,000, over 3,000,000 worldwide. As summer of 2021 arrived and several states began to “re-open,” there  was enough vaccine available for every American citizen, but a large part of the population was unwilling to take it. This reaction was due partly to the growing distrust of the national health leaders and the belief, by many, that the covid-19 issue had become politically “weaponized.” 

 February, 2021 brought a winter storm that paralyzed much of the nation with ice and snow. Wind turbines, which areas like Dallas depended on for electricity, were knocked out of service, leaving hundreds of thousands without heat or water in single-digit temperatures. Many lives were lost, and property damages reached into the billions.

In the last few weeks we have been horrified by the ineptitude of national leaders and the tragedies our citizens have suffered in Afghanistan. I agree with many who believe that this situation was man-made, ill-planned and unnecessary. What is to become of our nation if God  does not intervene?     

While it is painful to look back at these personal and national tragedies, we must learn from them and move ahead. Will our nation become more united as a result of our shared suffering? Will you and I learn vital lessons and grow from our experiences?  

Events such as these serve to remind us that we are often on the thin edge between life and death. The pandemic and other crises underscore how unpredictable life can be. Many who were fortunate enough to survive the staggering assaults of 2020 and beyond might never fully recover from the financial toll exacted on them. Even more tragic was the loss of irreplaceable lives of loved ones who succumbed to the virus and other devastations. And, now we have variant D to deal with.  

Overwhelming isn’t it? We are in trouble, trouble to the depths most of us have never experienced. There is only one hope. Surely we know by now that hope doesn’t reside in Washington, D.C. Why is God allowing all this to happen to us? Maybe we’re reaping the stupidity and sin our nation has been sowing for many years. Maybe, also, God is inviting us to repent and be healed. How far does our nation have to slide into ruination before we come to our senses?  Join with me and pray daily for our nation. God tells us He will save us if we repent, “If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked way, then I will forgive their sins and heal their land.” 2 Chronicles 7:14.  

Responding to Crises

 Crises are nothing new to our country. We have been through tough times before. A 2016 Times Magazine article reminds us we have had at least three major national crises in addition to the National Division (1970-present) we are currently experiencing. An update of the article would surely add our recent experience to the list. If so, the new list will look like this: Revolutionary War (1774-1783), War Between the States (1861-1865), Great Depression (1929-1938?), National Division (1970-present), and Covid-19 (2020).

The title of the article referenced above is “How Today’s American Crisis is Different.” The article’s focus is how, from the 1970s until today, there has been a fracturing of, a tearing apart, of the sense of unity and purpose that helped us overcome the earlier crises. E Pluribus Unum, “out of many, one,” doesn’t appear to be working out for us. Political gridlock and polarization define national politics. Where is our great unifying purpose? The constitution and government which survived the former crises seem to be under serious threat. How long can our nation survive conditions like this? 

One of the challenges we have about learning from our problems is the forgetful mindset we have adopted because of the instant news cycle we have become accustomed to. We are bombarded with multiple tragedies, murders, scandals, wars in real-time from home and across the world. Crises are part of the daily news diet and we simply cannot digest it all. We tend to become hardened to it and develop a survival attitude; reluctant to ponder the profound life lessons crises may hold for us. 

How can we look at these enormous challenges from a more personal, optimistic, and faith perspective? In his book, Faithful Change, Dr. James Fowler says that each generation has felt they lived in unprecedented times, experiencing the full range of challenges of human living. To live faithfully, we must learn to make good choices in light of those challenges. Fowler discusses  three kinds of change we must negotiate if we are to live faithfully: (1) developmental change,(2) healing or reconstructive change, and (3) change due to disruptions and modifications of the systems that shape our lives.

Developmental change is the process of physical, emotional, and intellectual challenges we face in the life cycle from conception, birth, young children, pre-adolescents, teenagers, young adults, and so on until old age and death. This process is ever-present as we deal with the two additional areas of challenge. I’m in my eighth decade and certainly notice lots of challenges that come with the territory. The next step in this process for me is dying. That idea doesn’t appeal to me but I know the One who will see me through that just as He has faithfully brought me to this stage of life. 

The second area, which Fowler refers to as “healing or reconstructive change,” has to do with the need for healing from harmful patterns of emotion and thinking which we have adopted to help us feel safe and less vulnerable to the harsh realities of life. This false sense of self and security is challenged when we lose a job, face a major health crisis, lose a loved one or go through a divorce or other significant disruption. Such a crisis presents an opportunity to reassess who we are and to make necessary changes. Think about how true this is in your personal experiences. How has God helped you faithfully change in light of personal loss or crises in your life?

Change due to systems that shape our lives has to do with the challenges that come from our participation in our society’s social, political, and economic processes. We often feel the only control we have in these areas is how we will respond to the decisions of those in power. We are in the midst of what is often labeled as a “cultural war.” One of the challenges a believer faces in this postmodern culture is how to maintain a faithful, loving witness in a society we believe to be in a rapid downward spiral. While we don’t control many of the financial, health-related, and political issues that affect us, we must learn from these crises and take responsibility for our choices. Our nation is in a mess on different fronts. How can we respond faithfully to what we see is happening to the country we love? 

 Life often poses a variety of challenges; coming at us from various directions. To live well, we must understand how our everyday choices form patterns of decision-making that will ultimately prove to be wise or foolish when the next crisis comes. And, troubles will come to each of us in one way or another.

Sadly, lots of folks may look back on these crisis events and regret their lack of preparation for the problems they faced. Some will wish they had spent more time with those they have lost. Others will chide their lack of financial discipline and regret they didn’t put away some savings for times like these.

Those most fortunate are those who will come to terms with the fact that material possessions and money, while necessary, are not a reliable source for our security. We are made for another world, and it is to our great benefit that we invest our life and temporal possessions in that world.

Whether solely personal or shared with much of humanity, every crisis is an opportunity to reassess how you live and invest in God’s priorities. There are more crises ahead, and the daily investments you make will be crucial in weathering the coming storms.

 Many believe our nation is in a great crisis politically, economically, and morally. Are the vitriol and divisiveness a harbinger of a country that is about to come apart at the seams? Where is that something or someone to bring us together, to unite us?